Eugene, Nurse Consultant, NHS Fife CAMHS

Eugene is a nurse consultant who works in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). Watch his video to find out what it's like to be a nurse consultant in the NHS.

Hi folks, my name's Eugene and I am a nurse consultant in Fife CAMHS Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services.

CAPTION: What attracted you to a career in the NHS?

I'm not sure I always wanted to be a nurse consultant, but it's certainly where I've found myself in the past few years. Initially, I was attracted to work in the NHS because I had previously worked in a kind of private care sector.

I really liked the thought of being a public servant and joining the NHS as opposed to remaining within the private kind of care sector and again worked my way up from being a newly qualified mental  health nurse to set myself a bit of a 10-year plan and got there within 8. I think setting yourself goals and plans is always a good thing to do.

CAPTION: Describe the education pathway to your role

Not traditional, I didn't do very, very well at school to begin with. School wasn't for me. However, on leaving school I had very, very luxurious opportunity of being able to go travelling for many, many years and meeting lots of different people from various different backgrounds. 

Learned about, learned a lot about how the world functions and how humanity exists within it in some respects. That kind of led me back into kind of higher education, doing the kind of nursing degree and then following that kind of moving on the kind of master's level and postgraduate diploma interests as well.

CAPTION: What's a typical day like for you?

There's no such thing. It's pretty unpredictable working in the world of CAMHS, but in a very good way. I couldn't describe a typical day. I'd be tempted not to because I could set it up and then the very next day something pretty left field will come in that we're needing to deal with and kind of respond to. But what it will say is a on a daily basis, I found the work exciting, challenging, inspirational and definitely rewarding.

CAPTION: What's the best part of your day?

Despite being a nurse consultant, I've still managed to maintain clinical responsibility, so I still work with children and families, which I absolutely love. Yeah, I guess that's the best part, it's kind of helping young people kind of navigate their journey of recovery really, you know, kind of being part of that process with them? It's, it's quite a privilege.

CAPTION: What are the most important skills for your role?

I think the most important skills if you were to consider being a kind of Nurse Consultant at some point yourself is to always be diplomatic. The art of diplomacy will go a long way in serving the kind of the patients that we work with, but also in terms of kind of good working relationships and long lasting working relationships. I think it's also important to kind of listen attentively, I mean properly listen whether it's a patient you're speaking to or can a member of staff kind of absolutely be there in that moment to kind of respond to them.

I think effective dynamic leadership is important as well, the kind of to be to put yourself in front and to kind of raise your head a little bit above the parapet. I think that's very, very important to have that skill set as a kind of nurse consultant.

CAPTION: What makes you proud to work in the NHS?

Wow, we've just come out the global pandemic and I think that really highlighted not just ourselves what we probably already knew, but to kind of the wider world, how impactful the NHS can be, how important it truly is and I think for me to to feel part of that system and that service makes me feel very proud to be on the frontline, actually making a difference in people's lives.

CAPTION: What makes you smile at work?

Pretty much everything. If I was unhappy at work, I'd be doing a different job. I think that's very, very important. I think if you're noticing that you're not smiling at work and have a think about that, what's going on, what can you change and how can you bring that into your kind of work? I think that's absolutely important to be and I think it's, I think it's okay to want that, to want to be happy at work, that seems reasonable to me.

So there you go. That's a brief synopsis of what it's like to be a nurse consultant. Certainly in my head anyway! Good luck!


What attracted you to a career in the NHS?

I'm not sure I always wanted to be a nurse consultant, but it's certainly where I've found myself in the past few years. Initially, I was attracted to work in the NHS because I had previously worked the private care sector.

I really liked the thought of being a public servant and joining the NHS, as opposed to remaining within the private care sector. So I worked my way up from being a newly-qualified mental health nurse to set myself a bit of a 10-year plan, and got there within 8. I think setting yourself goals and plans is always a good thing to do.

Describe the education pathway to your role

I didn't do very well at school to begin with, it wasn't for me. However, on leaving school I was able to go travelling for many years and meet lots of different people from various different backgrounds. I learned a lot about how the world functions and how humanity exists within it, in some respects.

That led me back into higher education, doing my nursing degree and then moving onto a master's and postgraduate diploma.

What's a typical day like for you?

There's no such thing as a typical day. It's pretty unpredictable working in the world of CAMHS, but in a very good way. I couldn't describe a typical day. I'd be tempted not to because I could set it up and then the very next day something pretty left field will come in that we need to deal with and respond to.

But what it will say is, on a daily basis, I find the work exciting, challenging, inspirational, and definitely rewarding.

What's the best part of your day?

Despite being a nurse consultant, I've still managed to maintain clinical responsibility, so I still work with children and families, which I absolutely love. I guess that's the best part. It's helping young people navigate their journey of recovery. It's quite a privilege to be part of that process with them.

What are the most important skills for your role?

I think the most important skills for a nurse consultant is to always be diplomatic. The art of diplomacy will go a long way in serving the patients that we work with, but also in terms of good working relationships and long-lasting working relationships. I think it's also important to listen attentively, whether it's a patient you're speaking to or a member of staff.

I also think effective dynamic leadership is important as well, so you're able to put yourself in front and raise your head bit above the parapet. I think that's very important to have that skillset as a nurse consultant.

What makes you proud to work in the NHS?

We've just come out of the global pandemic and I think that really highlighted, not just to ourselves, but to the wider world, how impactful the NHS can be, how important it truly is. I think for me to to feel part of that system and that service makes me feel very proud to be on the frontline, actually making a difference in people's lives.

What makes you smile at work?

Pretty much everything. If I was unhappy at work, I'd be doing a different job. I think that's very important. If you're noticing that you're not smiling at work, have a think about that. What's going on? What can you change and how can you bring that into your kind of work? I think it's important to want to be happy at work, that seems reasonable to me.